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Fishery

Learn about raising bangus, tilapia, and other fish crops in the Philippines

Oyster Farming in the Philippines

Oyster Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
Oyster farming in the Philippines began at Hinigaran, Negros Occidental, in 1921 and since then, it become the primary source of income for people living in the coastal waters of Hinigaran. The town is the biggest Oyster producer town in the country. Magallana bilineata, commonly known as the Philippine cupped oyster or slipper oyster, is an economically important species of true oyster found abundantly in the western Pacific Ocean, from the Philippines to Tonga and Fiji. In 2020 an exotic population was discovered in north-east Australia. They grow attached to hard objects in brackish shallow intertidal or subtidal waters, at depths of 0 to 300 meters (0 to 984 ft). They are cultured extensively in the Philippines, where annual landings can range from 11,700 to 18,300 tons. They are...
Green Mussel Farming in the Philippines

Green Mussel Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
Green mussel farming in the Philippines is widely distributed all over the country due to the economic importance of tahong and in this article, we will discuss how to grow tahong for profit. The Green Mussel The Philippine green mussel (Perna viridis), also called green shell in Visayas and Mindanao, and tahong in Tagalog, or Asian green mussel, is an economically important mussel, a bivalve belonging to the family Mytilidae. It is harvested for food but is also known to harbor toxins and cause damage to submerged structures such as drainage pipes. It is native to the Asia-Pacific region but has been introduced in the Caribbean, and in the waters around Japan, North America, and South America. Perna viridis ranges from 80 to 100 millimeters (3 to 4 in) in length and may occasionally ...
Giant Tiger Prawn Farming in the Philippines

Giant Tiger Prawn Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
Giant Tiger Prawn farming was one of the highly-profitable aquatic farming activities in the Philippines especially during the 80s when the country was still allowed to export. Today, because local demands are very high and prawn supply is low, tiger prawn farming is still highly profitable and one of the better medium-term investments. The Giant Tiger Prawn Tiger Prawn (Penaeus monodon), commonly known as the giant tiger prawn, Asian tiger shrimp, black tiger shrimp, and other names, is a marine crustacean that is widely reared for food. It is called sugpo in Tagalog and lukon/lokon in Hiligaynon.  The tiger prawn is one of the two most important prawn and shrimp species farmed in the Philippines. The other one is Penaeus vannamei or the White Leg Shrimp. Tiger prawn females can reac...
Halaan Farming in the Philippines

Halaan Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
Halaan farming in the Philippines is common on muddy beaches around the country, especially in places near estuaries. Halaan farming can be a profitable aquaculture business if properly managed and with enough clam seeds. The Halaan Shell Halaan (scientific name: Lajonkairia lajonkairii) is an edible species of saltwater clam in the family Veneridae, the Venus clams. It is popularly known as punaw in Negros and is one of the most economically important clam shells alongside blood cockle or blood clam (Litob in Negros, Tegillarca granosa). Halaan is different from Tulya (Corbicula fluminea) which grows in freshwater. Common names for the species include Manila clam, Japanese littleneck clam, Japanese cockle, and Japanese carpet shell. The shell of halaan is elongate, oval, and sculp...
Giant Freshwater Prawn Farming in the Philippines

Giant Freshwater Prawn Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
The giant freshwater prawn in the Philippines (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), locally known as ulang in Tagalog and Hiligaynon, is a valuable aquatic product that if properly managed, can provide good profit. The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) has been introducing this valuable freshwater product to fish farmers, but not many Filipinos are aware of how the ulang is properly managed in captivity. Giant Freshwater Prawn Description Freshwater prawns can be found in many rivers and lakes in the Philippines but because of habitat loss, catching them from the wild is no longer profitable. The prawn can grow up to 30cm (12inch) in length and can weigh up to a kilo. They are predominantly brownish in color but can vary. Smaller individuals may be greenish and display faint ver...
Aquaponics Philippines Guide: Fish and Vegetable Farming at Home

Aquaponics Philippines Guide: Fish and Vegetable Farming at Home

Agriculture, Fishery
Growing lettuce at home in aquaponics is a great alternative. Currently, the demands of modern life, as well as the consequent lack of time, often make it difficult to find fresh products in markets to place on our table. Hence, more and more people are interested in growing their own food at home. But how to do this, if we do not have land to grow our vegetables? That is why it is a viable option to combine the cultivation of vegetables in hydroponics using water from fish farming as a nutrient medium; So this system known as aquaponics does not require large spaces and can be done at home in patios, garages, roofs, and even balconies. Imagine, being able to grow your own lettuce, tomatoes, or cucumbers on your balcony! Of course, starting an aquaponic culture at home requires...
20 of the Most Profitable Animals to Grow in the Philippines

20 of the Most Profitable Animals to Grow in the Philippines

Fishery, Livestock, Poultry
Animal domestication in the Philippines for profit is among the top industries ever since the country was colonized by the Spaniards more than 500 years ago. Animal husbandry and livestock farming are one of the most profitable farm businesses that can even be done in a small backyard without the need for large financial capital. Backyard animal farming in the Philippines contributes bigger than commercial farms. In fact, of the total swine population, 72.1% were raised in backyard farms while the remaining 27.9% were from commercial farms. For poultry production, the Philippine broiler industry is composed of 20% backyard (fewer than 1,000 birds) and 80% commercial farms. There are reportedly 588 registered poultry farms and approximately 175 meat processors located throughout the coun...
African Hito (Catfish) Farming in the Philippines

African Hito (Catfish) Farming in the Philippines

Fishery
If you are searching for African Hito in the Philippines and want to know how to grow it, you are on the right page. Everything is now getting expensive and there is also a shortage of supply of food whether you have money to buy it or not. The government, under the newly-elected President Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos, is encouraging people to produce whatever type of food for personal consumption.  Marcos’ focus is on food production and this is the very reason why he, as of now, takes care of the Department of Agriculture (DA). Aside from crop production, fisheries are another important source of food whether it is from the sea or cultured. The government has been suggesting people raise tilapia, milkfish (bangus), catfish (dalag), and catfish (hito) as primary fish species to grow....